Number of MP3's Distributed: 12,350
1,100 stations are playing our PSA - Click Here to listen to the latest PSA

Category: PTSD/TBI (page 2 of 4)

Survey Results

Songs and Stories MP-3 System

We received a copy of a survey of the Warriors in Transition Unit at Ft. Stewart. We did not ask for the study, but they were kind enough to share the results. They wanted to find out if the soldiers were using the MP-3 that we supplied through The Landings Military Family Relief Fund and how they were using the system.

They found that:

  • 90% of those responding used the unit
  • 76% used it for music
  • 14% favored listing to books
  • 10% reported receiving the unit but had not yet used the device for various reasons.

The study also found that:

  • 52% of participants had downloaded from the web site.
  • Some soldiers were using their own device to download content.
  • A small number were unsure as to how to download content.

Conclusions:

  • While this is a small sample, it confirmed our belief that music helps those with sleep deprivation due to PTSD.
  • We need to address the downloading process so we will be developing an on line video tutorial on how to download content.

We thank Admiral, Paul Soderberg, (Retired) and the Landings Family Foundation for supporting this mission and sharing the results of the survey.

The U.S. needs to revisit our PTSDtreatment guidelines

The U.S. needs to revisit our PTSDtreatment guidelines

By Bret Moore, Special to Military Times12:09 a.m. EDT May 15, 2016
ptsd-mind
(Photo: Thinkstock/Staff)
Post-traumatic stress disorder is arguably the most challenging problem combat veterans face. Estimates vary, but experts believe that between 10 and 20 percent of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans suffer from the disorder. This puts the actual number of men and women affected in the hundreds of thousands.
Considering that PTSD wreaks havoc on the veteran and their loved ones, and costs billions of dollars each year, finding and using the most effective treatments are critical.
Historically, medications and talk therapy have been considered “first-line treatments.” This basically means they should be used first, and if they fail, then you try something else.  In fact, the joint treatment guidelines published by the Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs Department puts medications and psychotherapy on equaling footing. The same is true for the American Psychiatric Association.
Not all agree.
Organizations from the United Kingdom and Australia and the World Health Organization take the position that trauma-focused psychotherapies such as prolonged exposure, cognitive processing therapy, and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing are most effective when it comes to PTSD treatment. Basically, their stance is that the evidence for meds is just not as strong. A recent study carried out by military and VA researchers, and published in the journal Depression and Anxiety, supports this position.
After weeding through more than 60,000 possibilities, the researchers identified 55 psychotherapy and medication studies for PTSD. This added up to around 6,300 total study participants.
What did they find? Trauma-focused psychotherapies outperformed psychotherapies that do not specifically discuss the trauma. They also beat out medications.
This does not mean other psychotherapies are useless. For example, the researchers noted that stress inoculation training is effective for PTSD. SIT is a credible talk therapy that has been around for decades. It just may not be as effective as the trauma-focused therapies.
The same is true for medications. Zoloft and Effexor are commonly used for PTSD, and they do work for some people. But again, they may not be as useful as certain psychotherapies.
The bottom line is that the current United States-based treatment guidelines for PTSD may need to join the ranks of their European and Australian counterparts. Specifically, medications likely need to be identified as “second-line” treatments. In other words, they should only be used if an effective talk therapy is not available.
The results of this study challenge the current status quo with regard to treating our combat veterans. It is time to take a close look at how we prioritize PTSD treatments and make adjustments to our national treatment guidelines as necessary.
Bret A. Moore, Psy.D., is a board-certified clinical psychologist who served two tours in Iraq. Email him at kevlarforthemind@militarytimes.com. This column is for informational purposes only and is not intended to convey specific psychological or medical guidance.

DEA Okays PTSD Medical Cannabis Trials

Never say never.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has, at long last, approved a scientific study in which military veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder will be treated with medical marijuana, potentially expanding the market for MMJ businesses.

More states could add PTSD to their list of approved conditions for medical cannabis if the study shows that MMJ can be an effective treatment for the ailment.

The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), a nonprofit research organization in California, has been trying to win the DEA’s permission to begin the scientific studies for years. The trials could now begin by late May, Dr. Sue Sisley, a researcher with the organization, said in an email.

The study will involve 76 veterans, and aim to test the “safety and efficacy” of several different MMJ strains on PTSD, according to a press release from MAPS. The trials will take place in Phoenix and at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Blood analysis will be performed at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Sisley, as the Phoenix New Times has reported over the years, was fired from the University of Arizona in 2014 after advocating for the study. But she persisted in her pursuit of clinical MMJ trials.

She and MAPS eventually were able to convince the state of Colorado to pony up $2.1 million to help pay for the study. And the DEA’s permission was the last piece of the puzzle, because the trials need the go-ahead to obtain legal MMJ from the University of Mississippi, where the National Institute on Drug Abuse grows it.

Music to their Ears

music

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and How it can Effect Sleep

ptsdPost Traumatic Stress Disorder is a type of anxiety disorder that is induced in an individual after they have suffered from an experience that is psychologically traumatizing. Often associated with soldiers and returning vets and thought of as “shell shock” in the past, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is not isolated to just participants or victims of war. The types of events that can trigger the onset of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder can include physical, life threatening injuries, witnessing loss of life particularly that of a friend of loved one, near death experiences, threats to your own life or to the life or well being of another, or extreme emotionally terrifying or traumatizing episodes such as becoming a hostage, being abused or tortured, etc., and traumatic episodes such as a near fatal car crash or explosion. Unfortunately, these types of events are not isolated only to war zones which means that anyone may suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, even in the civilian population.

Like most anxiety and stress related disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder interferes with a patient’s sleep habits. In fact, the inability to fall asleep, difficulty sleeping through the night and reoccurring nightmares are some of the bench mark symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The physical problems that are associated with the disorder including pain that can be light or severe and chronic, trouble with the stomach and digestive system, and headaches can also make sleeping difficult. Flashbacks and reoccurring thoughts can also make it difficult for you to switch your mind off of the memories of the traumatic event and make it difficult to shut your brain down so that you can fall asleep.

Hearing things can also interfere with a full nights sleep since patients with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are often hyper alert to their surroundings making any background noise, such as a tv or radio, a distraction making it hard for you to fall asleep or can wake you up in the middle of the night.

For some patients, they are able to deal with this through therapy and using meditation and other stress relieving techniques, natural herbal aids such as chamomile tea, and aromatherapy used as essential oils or in sleep aiding sprays that you apply to your bed linens before bed to help them relax and get a good night’s sleep. For other patients, more intense treatments are required which may involve intense psychotherapy or even medication. So if you or a loved one is suffering from the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, speak to your care giver right away to explore the best options for you

Summary of Veterans Statistics for PTSD, TBI, Depression and Suicide.

  • As of September 2014, there are about 2.7 million American veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, compared to 2.6 million Vietnam veterans who fought in Vietnam; there are 8.2 million “Vietnam Era Veterans” (personnel who served anywhere during any time of the Vietnam War).
  • According to RAND, at least 20% of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans have PTSD and/or Depression.
  • A comprehensive analysis, published in 2014, found that for PTSD: “Among male and female soldiers aged 18 years or older returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, rates range from 9% shortly after returning from deployment to 31% a year after deployment.
  • PTSD is the third most prevalent psychiatric diagnosis among veterans.
  • 50% of those with PTSD do not seek treatment.
  • 19% of veterans may have traumatic brain injury (TBI)
  • Over 260,000 veterans having served in Iraq and Afghanistan so far have been diagnosed with TBI.
  • 7% of veterans have both post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury
  • Rates of post-traumatic stress are greater for these wars than prior conflicts
  • Recent statistical studies show that rates of veteran suicide are much higher than previously thought, as much 22 a day, up from a low of 18 per year in 2007, based on a 2012 VA Suicide Data Report.

Rehab Recovery offers resources for veterans affected by addiction and mental health issues. Contact Rehab Recovery here.

LMFRF Committed to Positively Affecting Lives

From the article:

As many of you know, the initial charter and purpose of the Fund have broadened. The Fund now is proactive in assisting soldiers with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) and TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury); we are in partnership with Armstrong State University and Savannah Technical College by providing scholarships; and we continue to look for other areas where we can broaden our reach.

Read the full article at landings.org

New stats on PTSD

Summary of Veterans Statistics for PTSD, TBI, Depression and Suicide.
  • As of September 2014, there are about 2.7 million American veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, compared to 2.6 million Vietnam veterans who fought in Vietnam; there are 8.2 million “Vietnam Era Veterans” (personnel who served anywhere during any time of the Vietnam War).
  • According to RAND, at least 20% of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans have PTSD and/or Depression.
  • A comprehensive analysis, published in 2014, found that for PTSD: “Among male and female soldiers aged 18 years or older returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, rates range from 9% shortly after returning from deployment to 31% a year after deployment.
  • PTSD is the third most prevalent psychiatric diagnosis among veterans.
  • 50% of those with PTSD do not seek treatment.
  • 19% of veterans may have traumatic brain injury (TBI)
  • Over 260,000 veterans having served in Iraq and Afghanistan so far have been diagnosed with TBI.
  • 7% of veterans have both post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury
  • Rates of post-traumatic stress are greater for these wars than prior conflicts
  • Recent statistical studies show that rates of veteran suicide are much higher than previously thought, as much 22 a day, up from a low of 18 per year in 2007, based on a 2012 VA Suicide Data Report.

Study: Military falls short in treating new cases of war-related stress

The U.S. military is struggling to provide adequate therapy sessions for thousands of active-duty troops suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, a massive study released Thursday concludes.

The RAND Corp. study of 40,000 cases, the largest ever, found that only a third of troops with PTSD and less than a quarter who are clinically depressed receive the minimum number of therapy sessions after being diagnosed.

Read the full article at usatoday.com

New Report Shows Uptick in Military Suicides Last Summer

Suicides in the U.S. military showed an increase over the summer months last year for active and reserve components compared to the same period in 2014, in a possible departure from a slight downward trend, the Defense Department reported Monday.

For the third quarter of 2015, including the months of July, August and September, the number of suicides recorded for the active duty military was 72, compared to 57 in the third quarter of 2014.

Read the full article at military.com

Older posts Newer posts
Donate to Songs and Stories for Soldiers by check or PayPal
Donate Now